-20.234, -70.153 // Shape of the Sky

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Once again daylight is increasing and nights are getting shorter.

Arrived in the Southern hemisphere where each shift south continues along the longitudinal arc of the earth as it revolves around our closest star in this six month dance with the sun. Within this calculated repetition of earth around the sun and moon around the earth, the light on land is anything but predictable. Local topography and weather treat the sun rays as regional pallets. Vast distances give way to elements that shape and shift the rays as they make their way to ground. This post shares images and drawings made when looking closely at the stratification in our atmosphere, conditions of the sky, and some of the effecting clouds from above.

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46.189, -123.849 // Equipment

In route from Seattle to the third project site _N45 for another set of light tracking, image gathering, and content sorting. Returning to the road is now a familiar reminder of the pace, weight, and gear required to capture the ever changing light. This contrast between framework and result was celebrated during a recent sharing of the project in Seattle’s Suyama Space with enlarged sketches indexing equipment on the floor while a projection of light images streamed on the wall. Sharing both the light and the equipment tracking light tethers any aesthetic or sublime to the project groundwork and the essential context from which the work takes place.

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50.027, -127.371 // Second Site

Fortunate weather and calm sea allowed for a quick arrival to the second project site. Good people recommending good places got us to Kyuqout Inn on the coastal edge of the 50th latitude. Far away lands are not so remote when one arrives to strong coffee, electricity, and internet. An enchanting fifteen minute hike gets us to the rocky ledge that serves as the location for light documentation over the next few days. Although enchantment may not be the term used when transporting three tripods, bowls, and a couple of packs by foot – underscore the importance to keep light gear light. Keeping pace with the sun equates to roughly one site documentation per week for the next twenty three weeks. Equally important is keeping pace with documentation processing, critic, and analysis. It is a small triumph then to post some samplings from site N55 taken during a couple hour stretch around sunrise, solar noon, and sunset.

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lubbock puddles

Lubbock, Texas has an average rainfall of 18.69 inches per year, only 2.69 inches greater than landscapes that earn being classified as a desert.  But when it does rain this concrete jungle becomes pocketed with pools and puddles.  The entire city holds a general cross sectional difference of 100′ inevitably leads the water to pool instead of shed.  Intersections become pools and the playas become lakes.

Impressively, the intersection out front of the TTU architecture building becomes one of the pools approaching 12″ deep along the street curbs.  People often take off shoes and wade across while cars create wakes or waves depending upon their ambition.

The water doesn’t stick around for long given the arid climate and frequent winds, but for the few hours after a heavy rainfall puddles and streams dot this usually harsh, windy and dry city.  Flat lands make for fantastic puddles.