overload and un-simplify

In “Les Grandes Epreuves de l’esprit” Henri Michaux states the human need “to overload and un-simplify” which Smiljan Radic refers when introducing his term dissolution construction technique and further illustrates as “unsteady joints, loose nails, oblique angles, rough measurements, splinters, fragility, oversizing, cracks, poverty.”

Valparaiso is an assemblage of dissolution construction techniques resulting in a rich collage of material and soft ambiguity of edges. Metal, wood and corrugated sheet metal are the prevalent city building materials and with portable tools are immediately modifiable, i.e. screw adds and saw edits. The following images are material examples of this directness in resolving what is at hand and one of the foundational characteristics of this city.

1_20130727_152822_Valpo_vmm_FragileConnections014

2_20130727_152729_Valpo_vmm_FragileConnections009

3_20130727_163406_Valpo_vmm_FragileConnections276

4_20130727_160919_Valpo_vmm_FragileConnections184-re

5_20130727_173312_Valpo_vmm_FragileConnections351

6_20130727_154538_Valpo_vmm_FragileConnections080

7_20130727_155333_Valpo_vmm_FragileConnections113-re

8_20130727_154749_Valpo_vmm_FragileConnections092-re

9_20130727_170741_Valpo_vmm_FragileConnections301

10_20130727_162526_Valpo_vmm_FragileConnections226

References:
Radic, Smiljan, “Un Ruido Naranjo” BIArch Lecture, 2010
Michaux, Henri, “Les Grandes Epreuves de l’esprit”, Gallimard, 1966